Argument as Conversation

In the past, I made a lot of researchers, which gave me an experience of doing it. As a result, when I read this article “Argument as Conversation” I recognize some aspects, which I was using it before when I made researchers process such as framing the problem, reading to find more information, ask questions, and discussed some thought about the topic with the classmate or with the teacher.

Greene distinguishes between reading as inquiry and reading as a search for information by using an example. Distinguish between them are difficult because they have small differences. As he said, “whatever you decide, you may begin to reflect upon your experience in new ways in developing and argument about what the purpose of education experiences might be”. If you read for inquiry you will develop your thought by raising a lot of questions and while you keep researching questions will increase until you find the good answers. In another hand, if you read as a search you will find the information that will answer your questions and you will finish.

Greene defined framing as that, “Framing is a metaphor for describing the lens, or perspective, from which writers present their arguments”. I agree with this definition because framing is a limited picture of something just like a lens to see the topic in one way. I notice a lot of writers using a frame to let the reader focus on one side by discussed the information the writer want it. For example, the book that we read divided to many chapters which make the reader focuses while he or she read in one aspect like education, solitude, and family. Also, framing is happening everywhere not only with the writer but also at work between employees and so on.

Finally, this article changed my thinking about how I read and write for the research because I learned the differences between reading for research and reading for inquiry which that will reflect my writing for this project.

 

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